Tag Archives: photog

Light Painting

Photo by Linda KnasellightPaint_Linda Knasel_6542

 

VotoArt recently ran a workshop for photographers that gave them an opportunity to try some light painting. Light painting is a great way to create interesting photos that can be entered into our abstract photo contests. If you want to win cash in the VotoArt photo contests, light painting is a great tool to have in your tool box. At our recent photo light painting workshop, many of the questions asked, were about how to get the correct settings for shutter-speed, aperture and ISO. For this reason we thought we would provide a little information about these settings so our members, who could not attend the workshop, could still jump in and have some fun experimenting with the art of light painting. We would love to see the photos you create be in our next abstract cash contest.

Shutter Speed is how long your camera aperture will stay open. If it is open for a long period of time, say 2 sec to 30 sec, it will  allow you to paint with different types of lights such as a flash light, LED, camera flash or even a spark as was done in the above photo. Where to set your aperture is determined by how long you need to “paint” in order to create the effect you are looking for.  The above photo had a speed of 30 seconds. This aloud enough time for a whisk full of  burning steel wool to be spun on a rope and throw off lots of sparks. The light streaks from the sparks were created by the long shutter speed.

Setting the Aperture

The aperture setting determines how wide the hole in your lens will be. The smaller the hole the greater the depth of field, so to help insure your subject is in focus you will want to have a higher number f stop. Remember the higher the number of the f stop, the smaller the aperture, and  the more in focus your photo will be. In short a f 22 will allow in less light and provide more depth of field than a F1.4.   The trade off of a higher f stop with a bigger depth of field is that  less light is allowed to reach the sensor due to a smaller opening. You will need to experiment to find the exact exposure and focus you need.

Setting the ISO

The ISO  determines how sensitive your camera’s sensor is to light. The higher the ISO number, the brighter your image will be. The lower the ISO number, the darker your image will be. The trade off is a higher ISO tends to introduce noise to your photo. You want the ISO to be as low as possible and still be able to expose the light source you are using to paint. Brighter lights will help you have a lower ISO.

Summary

In order to produce the exact results you want for your photo, you will need to experiment with the three settings. Because each of them will impact the other, you will want to look at the trade offs for the adjustment you make. While making those adjustments keep in mind  the following

Speed – The longer the exposure the more time you will have to paint, but the risk is exposing elements in your photo that you do not want to see, such as people doing the painting

Aperture – The larger the number of your f stop the more depth of field you will have to work with to keep your subject in focus.  The trade off is less light for exposure. You can compensate for less light with Higher ISO or longer exposures.

ISO – A higher ISO produces more exposure by making your sensor more sensitive to light but it  also introduce noise to your  photo.

Some samples from the VotoArt Contests

Photo by Justin Nichols

Justins bridge photo

Photo by Dhoni S

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Photo by Dika Photos

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Photo by Arie Azdhana

31328b24-ecc5-11e3-bc57-003048cab8f4Kai Leeke

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Photo by Dean Bennett

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Quick Tips for Award Winning Landscape Photography

Phil Koch is a fine art photographer who has won numerous awards and over $350 with his landscape photos on VotoArt. This blog post features some of his excellent work and gives a few tips of where to start and what to consider if you want to be a successful landscape photographer. To see more of Phil Koch’s photography, visit Phil Koch Fine Art Photography Portfolio

Phil Koch 007
Photo by Phil Koch

Shooting at Dawn

Shooting during the Golden hours is known for producing award winning landscape photos and dawn is one of the Golden hours. At first the light of dawn is a cool blue then just before the sun starts to rise the light is flat and almost colorless. As the sun breaks the horizon the magic starts to happen. The landscape is bathed in beautiful hues of red and orange illuminating everything it touches with its glorious rays. Unless you are naturally a morning person, trying to capture this beauty may mean work and persistence. You must be willing to head out in the gloom when there are lots of reasons for staying in bed at 3am knowing that there is a risk of it being cloudy and cold. Some landscape views may only work well at certain times of the year, depending on the position of the sun. You can determine where this will be by using a sun compass or an app that shows you where the sun will rise each day.

Things to consider
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